CareerMe

Careerme is a very informative site that provides helpful links and articles that cover a variety of fields in the manufacturing industry. Videos and job shadowing programs help to make this site a wealth of knowledge. Below is a sampling of the kind of "real, on the job" interviews with people who work in our industry.

Michael M. – Tool Designer

Mike

How did your education and activities prepare you for this job?

“I have a 4 year degree in computational mathematics. My first exposure to manufacturing was while working my way through school. After graduation, my manufacturing career stalled when my employer relocated twice, finally to Mexico. I became an instructor at St. Phillip’s College. I quickly realized this career path did not appeal to me. Returning to manufacturing would allow me to use my mathematics degree and give me the opportunity for advancement so I applied at Cox Manufacturing.

My first job at Cox was as a machine operator making parts. With my background in mathematics and CAD/CAM, Bill offered me the available position of tool designer. My degree was geared more towards computer science, but you can apply math to so many different things, so the transition to using the CAD system was relatively simple. Everyday I continue to learn on the job. Having the math degree helps me to think dynamically”

What advice would you give to students exploring a career in your industry and your field?

“Don’t take lightly your math and science. If you come to work on time, ready to learn every day, you have a job for life, no matter what you do.”

Tony L. – Master Machine Technician

Tony

How did your education and activities prepare you for this job?

“Preparations leading to my current job were primarily on-the-job training at Cox. I am comfortable working with equipment and found it easy to learn the skills required for being in the metal removal trade. Starting in the summer of ’89, I worked part time as a helper. I became interested in machining when my supervisor offered me the position of machinist trainee, I agreed. I had no idea what these machines were capable of doing or how they operated. Handling tools, being mechanically inclined, putting things together was “my thing”. It was a progression when I first started, from sweeping the floor, to spinning the chips, to recycling the oil, and running the machines. I have also worked in the Shipping Department and Quality Control giving me a rounded perspective of manufacturing.

What advice would you give to students exploring a career in your industry and your field?

“I can say that you really have to find your talent and skill. Within that talent and skill is your strength. I was mechanically inclined and I knew that my hands were my strength and that is why I enjoy manufacturing.

Troy H. – Process Engineer

Troy

How did your education and activities prepare you for this job?

“I took a two year course at Valley College in California for CNC programming, which taught me the basics including generic machine codes. I moved to San Antonio and have been employed at Cox since 1994. I have learned many aspects about the job working in this position; it is an evolving process. Computers and technology are constantly evolving. My path into manufacturing was through involvement in the metal shop in junior high, then in high school worked with CNC programming, CAD and metal design.”

What advice would you give to students exploring a career in your industry and your field?

“Manufacturing is a good field to be in; to participate in the growth of the country, developing new and interesting designs and products, working with your hands and head, as opposed to a desk job.

Interested in a career at Cox or ready to submit a resume?

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